Vincent “Vince” MacDonald

 

Vince MacDonald joined the Air Force ROTC while still a student at Brown University, earning his second lieutenant’s commission upon graduation in 1960. Over the next 30 years, MacDonald would work in personnel and career management at several bases in the U.S. and in Bermuda. While stationed at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware in 1978, he oversaw the receipt, processing and disposition of the victims of the tragedy in Jonestown, Guyana.

 

 

Vince MacDonald in uniform

 

Vince MacDonald starring in a comic strip

 

Vince MacDonald when he began his duties at Dover AFB, 1970s.

 

Vince MacDonald when he retired from Hansom AFB

 

 

Air Force article on Jonestown, page 1

 

Air Force article on Jonestown, page 2

 

Air Force article on Jonestown, page 3

 

 

Arnold Lessard

 

U.S. Army Air Corps, 1943-47

Arnold Lessard helped his father run a grocery store in Newburyport, and also owned a band that toured around the area. He enlisted in the Army in 1943; his ability to do math quickly helped him join the Army Air Corps soon after. He became a navigator and bombardier, and would be part of a B-17 crew testing radar equipment. Arnold Lessard was stationed in Japan during the American occupation. Lessard’s experience in the military led to a lengthy and successful career in consulting.

This interview was conducted by his son, Arnaud Lessard, at the Bedford VA Medical Center.

 

 

 

James Zographos

 

James Zographos had just graduated from the Mass. College of Pharmacy when he was drafted into the U.S. Army. Initially assigned to the infantry, Zographos would transfer to the Army Air Force, where he became a bombardier on board a B-17. Assigned to the 8th Air Force, he flew 50 missions, was wounded twice, and would be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and Purple Heart.

This interview was recorded at the International Museum of World War II-Boston.

 

 

Theodore “Ted” Zicko

 

Ted Zicko was born and raised in Natick. As a child growing up during World War II, he remembered rationing and seeing Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour at the Common during a bond drive. After the Korean War started, he enlisted with the U.S Air Force and spent four years in Intelligence as a linguist (Albanian language), forward observer and photo interpreter. He is a recipient of presidential citations from the United States and the Republic of Korea.

 

 

Ted Zicko and friend Charlie Behanna

 

Ted Zicko on the Okota Raiders baseball team

 

Ted Zicko at the Veterans Wall, Morse Institute Library, Natick

Gayle Turner

 

Gayle Turner joined the Air Force in 1974, at a time when women were being recruited for duties normally handled by men. She became a jet engine mechanic, serving in New Hampshire, Alaska and California before leaving the Air Force and joining the Air National Guard. While in the Guard, Turner became an officer, and would retire from the Guard in 2004 with the rank of major.

 

 

Gayle Turner, with jet engine crew

 

Gayle Turner, basic training

 

 

Gayle Turner, right, with squadron

 

Byron Prescott

 

Byron Prescott joined the U.S. Air Force in 1963 on the advice of his older brother. Trained as a radio operator, Prescott would be stationed in the U.S. and overseas, including a tour of duty in Vietnam that had him in the middle of the Tet Offensive in 1968. After finishing his active duty, Prescott would join the Mass. Air National Guard, where he would serve until his retirement in 1994 with the rank of master sergeant.

 

Andrew Lashenske

 

Andrew Lashenske graduated from Boston College in 1963, and wanted to go to law school. Because “I needed to mature myself,” and he needed money for law school, Lashenske enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. He became an officer with the 3800th Air Police Squadron, mainly at Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base in Montgomery, Ala. His experiences in Alabama and Texas included the Kennedy assassination and the Civil Rights march in Montgomery.

 

William “Bill” Callahan

 

Bill Callahan is a “30-year” man with service in both the U.S. Air Force and the Mass. Army National Guard. His active service with the Guard includes two tours of Iraq, during which he helped provide logistics and supplies for coalition forces (2003-04), as well as helped provide security around Camp Liberty near Baghdad (2007-08). Callahan would earn two Bronze Stars for his work.

 

 

Bill Callahan, formal portrait

 

Col. Callahan in Iraq briefing security guards from Uganda.

 

Col. Callahan at Camp Victory in Iraq